[H-GEN] Multi-thread downloads

Harry Phillips harry at tux.com.au
Thu May 27 03:10:30 EDT 2004


Sarah Walters wrote:
> Harry Phillips wrote:
> 
>> One of the reasons behind this is the throttling they now do at the 
>> humbug meetings. Each thread is limited to 8k/s, if you use DAP and 
>> set it to have 8 threads per file then the file comes in at 8*8k, 
>> giving you 64k/s.
>>
> 
> This bugs me on so many levels.
> 

If I went a week without getting under someone's skin, it was a waste :)

I don't do it intentionally, but it just reassures me that I am not 
staying "safe" in my comfort zone and I am expressing my opinions.

> Firstly, HUMBUG meetings are not intended to be a download-fest.

Did you miss the "*One* of the reasons..." part?

> If you 
> want to download stuff, get a decent ADSL plan and do it from home.
> 

Are you going to pay for it?

> Secondly, has it occurred to you that perhaps there is a *reason* why 
> HUMBUG is throttling connections? I don't know what it is, but I daresay 
> it's the excessive amount of downloads that occur. I suspect that you 
> would find that trying to work around the throttling is a very effective 
> way of getting yourself or the entire meeting banned from the UQ network.
> 

The main reason I go to the HUMBUG meetings is not the downloading, I 
would say that half to 1/3 of my time spent there is not even at *my* PC.

I would not say that I download an excessive amount. What I liked about 
the previous setup was that *if* I needed to download something I could 
get it very quickly.

I must admit there have been times that I went there with the intention 
of a big download. Each time asked around first to see if anyone already 
had what I was after.

Like last week, and I ended up buying the download version of "Mandrake 
10.0 Official". I even created the 4 ISO's and put them on the cluster 
host, I don't know what David did with them but I believe he has made 
them available to anyone that wants them.

> Thirdly, download "accelerators" are rude. A web/ftp server has a set 
> amount of bandwidth, which it tries to share equally among its clients. 
> 

I don't run a public web/ftp server so I am curious, how many of those 
of you that do max out your bandwidth?

Is it a case of buying as much bandwidth as possible so that it doesn't 
max out?

Do you consider it an annoyance that all these "leechers" create a 
situation that you have to buy more bandwidth that you would have?

-- 
Regards,
Harry Phillips




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